Help Us Make Disaster Food Boxes

As the tornado survivors in Arkansas begin to put their lives back together, we know there will be so many decisions to be made and obstacles to overcome. At the Arkansas Foodbank we want to take away one of the worries they may have in their day-to-day struggles. We will be supplying disaster food boxes to survivors in the damaged areas, consisting of easy to prepare, non-perishable items they can have on hand to eat as they are working in their communities and homes.

We recognize that many families will not have adequate refrigeration or cooking options for many weeks to come. If our past experiences hold true, many will even camp out in what used to be their front yards. Therefore, it will be critical to help them stay as close to home as possible and have as few distractions as possible. Providing disaster food boxes will help them have one less thing to worry about.

We would be honored if you would choose to help us collect food and/or funds to provide these boxes.

Help Tornado Victims With These Items

Feinstein Foundation Million Dollar Challenge

For the seventeenth straight year, the Feinstein Foundation is offering a $1,000,000 challenge grant to help anti-hunger agencies around the country like the Arkansas Foodbank raise money to help fight hunger in our communities.

Every dollar and every pound of food (tallied at $1.00 per pound) contributed to the Foodbank from now until April 30 increases our share of these challenge funds.

How can you help? Make a donation or host a food drive. Every dollar and every pound of food counts!

Join us in this exciting challenge campaign! See Mr. Feinstein's personal letter below about the challenge and how much your support means to this important cause.

 

Please use MY money to help your neighbors in need!

Dear Friend,

My name is Alan Shawn Feinstein. For the past 16 years, I have been giving away $1 million each year to anti-hunger agencies throughout the country.

This year, I am doing it again…

WHATEVER YOU DONATE TO THIS AGENCY,
I WILL ADD MONEY TO IT. THE MORE
YOU GIVE, THE MORE OF MY $1 MILLION
THEY’LL GET—THANKS TO YOU!

Why am I doing this? Because I believe each of us was put here on earth to do what we can to help those in need. We feel that YOU believe that, too.

This has become the greatest grass roots campaign ever to fight hunger in our country. Your donation makes you a partner in it with me! 

My money started this campaign but it is YOU who will help decide how many needy people in your city or town will be fed this year. I’m only here to give you some support and to remind you of this:  All that will matter to us someday is what we did while we were here to help those who needed us.

We Are Needed Now!

Please give whatever you can - I will gladly add some of my money to yours.  My $1 million will be divided in full proportionately among the agencies receiving donations toward my offer.

Thank you for sharing my heart, and the hope that — someday — no one will ever go hungry.

Sincerely Yours,
Feinstein Signature


Alan Shawn Feinstein

Foodbank Targets Underserved Counties

It can be said that our nation's prosperity is tied to the prosperity of our rural communities.This is especially true in Arkansas, where agriculture has always been a tradition and a big part of our economy. However, the irony of it all is that the same families who have spent centuries in rural Arkansas, producing food for thousands across the globe, now live in areas where food is most scarce. The numbers speak for themselves; so do the stories:

A man in his 20s in Van Buren County is unable to find work in an area where there are very few jobs, and those available are more concentrated in low-wage industries.

An elderly woman in Dumas dreamed she was standing in a large room and handing out food to people of all ages and races who were reaching their hands up to her. She awoke from the dream saying, "Help them all; help them all." Her husband woke up too and asked, "How can you help all of them when you don't have anything to help yourself?"

And in Eudora, a mother of two drove 15 miles to the nearest pantry, only to be turned away because they didn't have enough food to support anyone outside their area.

These are just some of the harsh realities that those in rural Arkansas face on a daily basis. And that's why the Foodbank has become more aggressive than ever in feeding Arkansas' underserved counties.

Read more: Foodbank Targets Underserved Counties

Have You Met Kate?

Hungry KateHungry Kate, an animated short subject that tells the story of how the Arkansas Foodbank is fighting hunger, is available for viewing!

With a catchy acoustic guitar soundtrack. the video tells the story of the hypothetical Kate, whose father's layoff sets off a troubling series of consequences, from the family falling into debt, losing their home through foreclosure and eventually having to choose between basic necessities like rent and food. The bottom line is that Kate and her family are hungry until they begin visiting their local food bank.

Kate represents the 90,000 children in central and south Arkansas who, through no fault of their own, don't know where their next meal is coming from.

Hungry Kate is recommended for viewing by school and church groups, civic organizations and individuals wishing to know more about how to meet the needs of the many thousands of hungry people in Arkansas.

The project was developed in partnership with the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank and the internet marketing firm Joint Effort Marketing. 

Foodbank Announces Opening of Sparkman Community Food Pantry

The grand opening of the first community food pantry in Sparkman, Ark., was held Thursday, Sept. 6, at the new pantry at 104 West Taylor Street in Sparkman. More than 175 people were served on opening day, said Peggy Vickers, Arkansas Foodbank’s Community Relations Director, who assisted with the startup. The Foodbank provided a truckload of food to begin the new pantry’s operations.

The Sparkman Food Pantry will become a member of the Caddo Valley Branch of the Arkansas Foodbank. It will pick up food supplies from the Caddo Valley food bank warehouse near Arkadelphia. The pantry has widespread community support.

“This is a wonderful group of dedicated individuals who have worked tirelessly to make this pantry a reality,” said Vickers. “It is a real joy to see a community come together and work so hard to accomplish their goal of feeding the hungry.”

Mayor Henry Nalls, a life-long resident of Sparkman, with the City Council are spearheading the effort to create the pantry. Dallas County Judge Jimmy Jones has supported the effort. A vacant doctor’s clinic was donated for the site of the pantry, with lumber donated to build shelves to hold canned goods and other food and supplies. Mayor Nalls and a friend built the shelves in the separate clinic offices. Judge Jones was helpful in securing donated appliances, including a large commercial refrigerator for the pantry. Entergy made it possible to begin electrical service to the pantry.

Sylvia Savage, the pastor’s wife from Sparkman United Methodist Church, assisted in many ways, including volunteer recruitment. Sylvia was able to get the use of a freezer from the Community Center with Pastor Kevin Moss’s approval. The Community Center is located across the street from the pantry. About 15 volunteers have been recruited to assist with regular operation of the pantry, which will be open weekly on Fridays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Area churches contributed to raise funds for the pantry, and local businesses have chipped in.

Subcategories

30th Anniversary Faces

Faces of Hunger Relief

To commemorate the Arkansas Foodbank’s 30th Anniversary, we're highlighting 30 people who made a difference in fighting hunger in Arkansas. These people are passionate champions for the hungry and have helped shape the Foodbank into the cornerstone of hunger relief that it is today. 

Virginia Brissey

 

Faces of Hunger Fighters

The best advocates for food pantries and SNAP programs are those who've lived through the experience and are using it to help others. 

Ashley Williams, Student and Hunger Relief Advocate

Joy Rockenbach, Obesity Prevention Coordinat

 

 

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